For the first time since it was raised from the seabed, the Tudor flagship, Mary Rose will go on full display to the public from 20 July. The public will have a chance to witness the unobstructed views of For the first time since it was raised from the seabed, the Tudor flagship, Mary Rose will go on full display to the public from 20 July. The public will have a chance to witness the unobstructed views of Henry VIII’s most famous ship, the Mary Rose.

The Tudor warship has undergone constant restoration work for the last 34 years since it was raised from the Solent in 1982. Following a £39 million investment, visitors to The Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard will now be able to take in panoramic views of the ship.

Floor-to-ceiling glazing has been installed on the lower and main decks.

The story of The Mary Rose in numbers

• 1510 – the year the Mary Rose was built.

• 600 trees were used to build the warship.

• 1545 – the year the Mary Rose sunk, on the 19 July during the 3rd French War.

• 500 men on board, only 35 survived.

• 5 foot 7 inches was the average height of a crew member.

• The Mary Rose sank to the bottom of the Solent lying on the seabed at a 60° angle.

• 1971 – the year the Mary Rose site was discovered and excavation began.

• 27,831 dives made to Mary Rose during the modern excavation project.

• 22,710 hours of marine archeological excavation of the seabed.

• 437 years Mary Rose spent underwater.

• 1982 – the year the Mary Rose was raised from the seabed.

• 60 million people worldwide watched this event.

• 19,000 artifacts have been recovered from the site so far including:

• 6,600 arrow bits.

• 9 barrels containing bones of fully-grown cattle

• 1 full skeleton of a dog aged between 18 months and 2 years old. He goes by the name of Hatch.

• 100 tons of water extracted from the Hull and its environment over the last 3 years

• The Mary Rose has received 9 million visitors since she was first displayed in 1983

• 2016 – the year the Mary Rose Museum reopens to reveal the Tudor ship to the world, visitors will be able to view the ship from all 9 galleries in the museum.

 

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