Parenting is one of the biggest problems the parent go through while raising their kids. Some of the parents are worried about their kids mental status, as some of them behave quite abnormal.

However, Susan Hepburn who has over thirty years’ experience treating children has developed a quiz to tell whether your child is struggling from any mental issues.

It’s suggested that if the parents suspect signs of mental health illness such as ADHD, extremes or peculiarity of behavior or depression in children, it’s important to seek help from an expert in child psychology.’

Hepburn cites social media addiction, exam pressure, and body image are some common issues which lead to the poor mental health of children and youngsters.

Hepburn has developed a simple quiz that helps the parents to determine whether there is really a cause for concern.

QUIZ

Sleeping habits: My child’s sleeping habits have become notably disturbed. They are experiencing periods of insomnia, have constant waking’s or need to sleep excessively (over 11 hours per night). Bed wetting may also be an issue.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)

Mood: There has been an apparent change in their mood which is consistently low or fluctuates drastically between a depressive state and elation or happiness. They may struggle to concentrate on tasks or lash out unpredictably.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Eating habits: Erratic eating, a lack of appetite or excessive consumption has become a significant issue for my child. There has been a notable rise or drop in their weight, eating habits have changed and they cover up in baggy clothes. Self-confidence is related undoubtedly to the success of their weight goals.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Gaming and social media: My child spends far more time on games, social media or interacting with their phone or tablet than they do with family and friends. They struggle to maintain close friendships or seem immensely distracted or disinterested in personal communication and instead choose to lock themselves into their rooms.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)

Anxiety: My child is notably uptight and excessively worried. They have unexpected panic attacks about perceived issues or feel agitated carrying out basic or social tasks. They may struggle to make decisions or be reluctant to leave the house.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Desire for attention: My child shies away from attention and has little wish to communication or tries to consume attention at the expense of those around them. They show little consideration for the needs or requirements of others.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Addictive or obsessive behaviour: Repetitive or excessive activities are impacting badly on daily functions.

These could range from obsessions with food, eating, drugs, alcohol or other.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Perfectionism and self-criticism: My child is excessively over-critical about their physical appearance, mental ability or other aspects of their lives. They focus on flaws and are visibly distressed or grossly disappointed in themselves for any deviation from their desired path. This really interferes with their daily life.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Bullying: There has been a marked change in attitude towards peers, friends and classmates or social isolation has been a long-term issue. Their self-confidence is incredibly low, or my child has expressed the belief that they are worthless or unlikeable despite my assurances.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)
Loss of a loved one or separation: Your child has experienced a traumatic life event – such as a death of a loved one or a divorce or separation of a family. This has resulted in a notable change in behaviour including withdrawal, anger or extreme sadness.

Almost all the time (4)
Sometimes (3)
Rarely (2)
Never (0)

THE RESULTS

Less than 10 – You child may be experiencing worries that are causing issues, but these could be part of the ups and downs of daily life. You should keep a close eye on the situation and escalate further if these behaviours persist or intensify. In particular, if you have answered a 4 rating for two or more answers you must monitor these specific behaviours closely.

11-20 – You child may be experiencing a notable issue. Gently talk to them and consider whether there are other problems under the surface. Seek further advice if more symptoms begin to show or if existing symptoms intensify.

21- 30 – Seek more information about issues that may be impacting significantly on your child’s health. Talking gently but indirectly to your child about how they are feeling is important. Professional help from your GP or a professional is recommended.

31 – 40 – These is a significant likelihood your child is struggling with a mental health issue that needs treatment. It is recommended that you urgently get a second opinion from a professional – preferably a GP, a counsellor, physician or a psychologist.

How you talk to your child about your mental health condition (if you have one of course) will depend on the age and maturity of your child and your willingness to open up to him or her.

Before proceeding, you should always talk to your doctor or therapist about the best ways to bring this information up. You may want to consider the possibility of inviting a child to a session to explore this information.

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